TrizCom clients

And the Award Goes to… Top 5 Reasons Industry Awards Are Good for Business

By Katie Mudd, TrizCom PR

As public relations professionals, we are often like the proverbial cobbler’s children that don’t have shoes – we’re so busy working to keep our clients in the news that we forget to take time to promote ourselves. Throughout the year, we find ourselves preparing award applications for our clients, so it seems like a no-brainer that we would do the same for ourselves.

Hollywood may recognize award season each fall, but we tend to kick things into gear every summer for PRSA Dallas’ annual Pegasus Awards, which highlight the best public relations campaigns in the DFW Metroplex. Over the past two years that we’ve participated, TrizCom has managed to bring home six awards. I know what you’re probably thinking … is the time investment really worth having shiny hardware displayed on your shelf? And the answer is yes, because awards are good for business.

Here are just a few reasons why awards have been good for our business and the clients we work with.

1.    J.D. Power Effect

When you tell others how awesome you are, it’s bragging, but if you’re included on a J.D. Power list of people who are awesome, it’s proof. This credibility provides you with a third-party endorsement that validates your awesomeness. Find out more about our coined J.D. Power effect here.

2.    Morale Boost

Employees want to be recognized for their hard work. When they feel valued for what they do, work becomes more than just a job – it’s a mission. In turn, they are willing to work harder and give more when their time and talent are appreciated. The recognition of award-winning work is guaranteed to provide a morale boost that will keep employees happy and on staff.

3.    Talent acquisition

By showing off the great things your team can do, you’re able to attract top talent who also wants to be a part of the action. During tough times, awards provide a vote of confidence to potential employers of companies that might be more likely to pull through.

4.    Exposure

Your shiny award is lovely to keep on a shelf, but there is much more you can do with it. Start with drafting a press release announcing your big win. Keep the momentum going year-round by repurposing it on your website, business cards, email signature and social media.

5.    Business procurement

Customers want to be associated with winning companies. A study conducted by Hendricks & Singhal of the University of Western Ontario and Georgia Institute of Technology revealed that more than 600 quality corporate award winners had 37 percent more sales growth than their peers. When prospective clients note that your business has been recognized, it might be the differentiator over your competition, because you're seen as the best at what you do.

In the past few years, TrizCom has successfully won recognition for our clients and individuals in local, regional and national media outlets. Want to be the Beyoncé of your business? We can help with that. Just give us a call at 972-247-1369 or drop us a line at trizcom@trizcom.com.

TrizCom Client: Soulman’s Bar-B-Que Celebrates the Commander-In-Beef

Presidential History is Full of Bar-B-Que Traditions

By Dana Cobb, TrizCom PR

Bar-b-que has been a longstanding tradition for holidays like the Fourth of July and Labor Day. Families and friends gather around a grill to enjoy ribs, brisket and sausage smothered in sauce. Many do not realize that, like America, bar-b-que has evolved over time as presidents pass down their traditions from one to another.

America’s love for bar-b-que began with our first president, George Washington. In a 1769 journal entry, he wrote, “Went in to Alexandria to a Barbecue and stayed all Night.” He attended and hosted several bar-b-ques from then on, passing down a tradition many of our leaders continued. The seventh president, Andrew Jackson, made bar-b-que a staple at presidential campaigns and is credited as the first to establish the Election Day bar-b-que.

Former President James K. Polk was not known as a bar-b-que supporter, but he was in power in 1845 when Texas was added to the Union. Without him, Texan bar-b-que would not be American. Former President Abraham Lincoln’s campaign rallies were usually at picnics with pit bar-b-qued turkey. Burgoo, a stew-like meal of meat and vegetables, often accompanied the turkey.

Former President Dwight Eisenhower was seen grilling at the White House on several occasions throughout his residency. He said he could eat steak every day of the week. At times, the public wrote to the White House inquiring about recipes for different sauces. He was delighted to pass on his tips and tricks.

Former President Lyndon Johnson became the most important representative for Texas bar-b-que. His caterer, Walter Jetton, fed 300 hungry mouths at the first bar-b-que state dinner. LBJ continued to host prominent leaders at the White House and his Texas ranch throughout his presidency, usually serving ribs and brisket.

Former President George H.W. Bush also preferred Texas bar-b-que. He hosted regular Sunday bar-b-ques on the White House Lawn. He passed the tradition down to his son, former President George W. Bush, when he served as president. President Bush had planned a bar-b-que on Sept. 11, 2001. The event was cancelled, and the meals were instead given to first responders at the Pentagon.

America’s newest president, Donald Trump, also enjoys some good bar-b-que. He surprised diners after a rally in Greensboro. He ordered a large chopped pork bar-b-que plate with slaw, hush puppies, French fries and sweet tea. It will be interesting to see if our current president will utilize bar-b-que at the White House during his presidency and if bar-b-que will continue to make its mark on American history in the years to come.